HURRICANE OPHELIA has been causing chaos to departing and incoming flights in the UK, but terrifying footage of those brave enough to brace the storm has emerged.
Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Read More






HOTEL guests who next go to boil a cup of tea after a long day may want to think again when using the kettle.

Hotel rooms hide all sort of secrets, from when the bedding was last washed to who last used the bathroom.

Even high-end hotels don’t keep the rooms as clean as guests may think, with items such as the bedspreads and glasses rarely getting cleaned.

However one of the more popular items in the room has also come under fire for not being the cleanest thing to use.

It may make tired guests rethink their next cup of tea.


It has recently emerged that some people staying in a hotel use the kettle to wash their dirty underwear, by boiling them within it to sterilise them.Australian site Gizmodo found one man, Guy Blomberg asking the question on Twitter: “Real question: does anyone I know clean their underwear in a kettle when travelling?”He then went on to explain how a frequent travelling friend of his told him.Defending his side, he reiterated: “Heard it from a friend of mine, beware travellers. This is a customer service announcement for your safety and happy tea drinking

Not only is it a disgusting thing to do, but it isn’t clean for either the person washing their underwear or the people to do it afterwards.Senior Lecturer in Molecular Biosciences Dr Heather Hendrickson spoke to Gizmodo about the repercussions.She confirmed: “Your friend is unlikely to have a large number of highly heat resistant pathogens in his dirty undergarments but we do not know what he DOES have in there or how sick he might be.”There are simply too many unknowns and hotel kettles are not industrial strength cleaning facilities.”Whilst many may hope it is just a disgusting rumour, it will certainly stop some travellers from next using the kettle.

Read More


PILOTS reguarly work long hours as part of the job, but do they still sleep on long-haul flights?

Working on long-haul flights can be a taxing one, even for the most experienced of cabin crew.

From constant service to dealing with irate passengers, it is a tricky job to do

However as flights continue to get longer, with the most recent longest flight a whopping 17 hours, more is expected from both pilots and flight attendants when it comes to working long hours.


One question that many passengers often ask is whether pilots sleep during a long haul flight.

Of course, pilots do sleep on long haul flights, due to the danger it could create if they didn’t rest often.However, it can vary between the type of plane and the length of the journey.Aviation website Flightdeckfriend.com explains the concept behind their sleeping patterns, called “controlled rest.” when it is a shorter flight.

It states that controlled rest should be between 10 and 30 minutes so the sleep is a lighter REM cycle, to prevent a deeper sleep which can leave feeling son further tiredness and grogginess.

The website states: “Only one pilot should take controlled rest at a time and that should be in his/her seat but with the seat pulled back away from the controls.

“Once the resting pilot is woken he should avoid operating the controls for at least 15 minutes to ensure he/she has fully awoken and is alert.”

For extremely long flights, such as the Qatar Airways sixteen-hour flight from Doha to Auckland, there would be two pilots and two first captains to ensure two could sleep whilst two controlled the plane.


This is done in shifts of four hours in rotation, where they retire to their special bunk areas in the plane or business class seats which are reserved for the crew.Travel forum Quora also explained how this works between the four cockpit crew members.User Usha Kotipatruni stated: “All long haul flights have 2 crews: the Operation crew and the Relief crew.

“The Operation crew essentially takes care of take-off and landings.

“In-between these phases, during the cruise, the Operation crew can rest, while Relief crew handles the flying.”

Read More


1. Location, location, location. Just like in real estate – find out where you are going to be and what is available around you. Is the bus, train, highway near? Where are the shopping malls? How far is it to that temple you want to visit? Remember when reading through the hotel write-ups – not every hotel is “centrally” located. Avoid Khaosan Road unless you like backpackers.

2. Don’t be fooled by a name. Most of the hotels in Bangkok use the words “Grand”, “Boutique”, “Royal”, “Luxury”, “Executive” in the name of the hotel – so just because you booked a room at the Royal Grand Executive Luxury Boutique Service Apartments doesn’t mean the place will be royal, grand or any of the other words.

3. Ask your friends. If they have gone to Bangkok before, ask them where they stayed and get a recommendation. This doesn’t mean you have to stay there – but it should give you some ideas.

4. Shop around. The Internet is a wonderful place. Pop in the name of the hotel you want information on in Google, and you will see a myriad of info and a range of prices. Take good notes. Read actual reviews keeping in mind most people are more willing to write a negative report as opposed to a positive one.

5. Find a forum. There are many forums available on Thailand in general and Bangkok specifically. Most will let you read the info without registering but if you want to post a question you will have to register. A good place to get very current information.

6. Is it near the “action”? Bangkok is infamous for its nightlife and you may or may not want to be close. Most nightlife is centered on Patpong Road (between Silom and Surawongse roads), Nana Entertainment Plaza (Sukhumvit and Soi 4), and Soi Cowboy (near Soi Asoke). So these are the areas to either avoid or make your reservations.

7. Sukhumvit is a very long road. Your friend recommends a hotel on Sukhumvit road but can’t remember which Soi (small street or alley) it is on. So, based on her recommendation, you book a room on Sukhumvit and Soi 103 only to realize it is a gazillion miles from anything. If you want to be centrally located – find a place off Sukhumvit between Sois 1 and 23.

8. What else is included? Free breakfast? Free Wireless? Transportation to and from the airport? Cable, Satellite, DVD, International Direct Dial (IDD) phone? Check to see what is and what is not included.

9. Is there a joiner fee? For the single guys who may bring back a guest for the evening, some hotels charge ridiculous amounts of Baht for having a guest. Best to ask first, and then avoid. You may be able to beat this if you book a double – but it isn’t worth the hassle.

10. You get what you pay for. Don’t expect Marriott service at a flea bag. We all want value for our money – but if you go cheap – don’t expect much. Look for a mid-range priced hotel – around £50 per night and you should be satisfied. Bangkok, and all of Thailand, has different prices for different times of the year – high and low season. Check the listed prices carefully.

11. Have fun and smile. Remember – you are in a foreign country and they may not do things like they do back home. Keep your cool, avoid arguing and smile. If you have a problem, ask for the manager and explain it with calm words and a pleasant tone. Yelling and screaming will get you nowhere in the Land of Smiles.

12. Online consolidators can often beat the price of a direct booking.

13. You don’t land at Don Muang Airport any more. Bangkok has a relatively new airport – Suvarnabhumi – about 50 kilometers further south than Don Muang. Plan your airport hotel accordingly.

14. Don’t expect the hotel staff to be fluent in your language. Most will speak English to a degree. Get a dictionary and learn a bit of Thai.


Read More



Television presenter KIRSTIE ALLSOPP, 46, is best known for shows such as Location, Location, Location and Kirstie’s Handmade Christmas. She lives in Holland Park in London with her partner Ben Andersen, a property developer, and their sons Bay, 11, and Oscar, nine. She’s also stepmother to Ben’s sons Hal and Orion.
Daily Express :: Travel Feed

Read More

1 2 3 8